A Federal TRIO Program

Mulu Negash

Director
Primary office:
785-864-9627
1122 W. Campus Rd., Joseph R. Pearson Hall, Rm 304


Mulu Negash, a former McNair Scholar serves as the Director of McNair Scholars Program. Mulu has worked in TRiO programs in various capacities for several years. Mulu has a background in counseling psychology and advising middle/high school students. Prior to working with TRiO, she worked in mental health counseling for the unisured in the Greater Kansas City area. A native of Ethiopia, she has made her home in Kansas City.


APPLICATION PRIORITY DEADLINE

   NOVEMBER 7, 2014 

Alum Survey
This evening, we will have our third symposium. A faculty panel will take the time to answer your questions about what makes a good graduate school candidate, how to survive graduate school, and how to be successful in school and beyond. Don't miss it!
#RockChalk ! New Foundation Distinguished Professor to join KU: expert in ecology and microbiology. http://t.co/AaiY2CEyYZ
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”